Web Statistics

St Pancras International will forever be linked with the world of poetry. It was saved from demolition by Sir John Betjeman, who was Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom from 1972 until his death.

To celebrate our ties with poetry, not only can you enjoy a statue of John Betjeman on the upper concourse but every year we hold the Betjeman Poetry Prize. First launched in 2006 to mark the centenary of John Betjeman's birth, the prize attracts around 3,000 entries per year from across the UK and aims to foster creativity in young people whilst discovering and encouraging the next generation of British poets.

We also celebrate National Poetry Day and in the past have partnered with Poet in the City and Maslaha to host a wide range of poetry activity. Keep your eye on our Events and News pages to be aware of our poetry events!

The 2016 Betjeman Poetry Prize named Archita Sinha as the winner, out of a shortlist of six young poets from thousands of competitions entries. Archita was also named the second St Pancras Poet Laureate, following Lucy Arnold-Forster. In her role as St Pancras Poet Laureate, Archita will write three original poems inspired by the architecture and events of St Pancras International which will be released across the year.

In 2016, the prize ceremony was attended by guest judge Imtiaz Dharker. Imtiaz worked with judges including Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy to whittle down thousands of entries to the shortlisted six. The prize ceremony on the Grand Terrace brought a large audience and was attended by prize patron Joanna Lumley.

The Betjeman Poetry Prize is currently accepting entries into their 2017 competition. Please visit the Betjeman Poetry Prize website for all the details. You have until 31st July 2017 to enter!

THE SKY OF MY IMAGINATION

The sky of my imagination is unfolding

Like a stain of blood on paper.

The sky of my imagination is blank

Like eyes without humour.

The sky of my imagination is lonely

Like a melancholy rumour.

 

The sky of my imagination has clouds

That envelope the grief.

The sky of my imagination has stars

That move in my dreams.

The sky of my imagination has a moon

Which scowls in disbelief.

 

The sky of my imagination has sadness

Like an unfinished song in the summer.

The sky of my imagination has happiness

Like the brightness of spring flowers.

The sky of my imagination has fear

Like the loud autumn thunders.

The sky of my imagination has confusion

Like the eerie mist in winter.

 

The sky of my imagination is a crop

From seeds that life has sown.

The sky of my imagination is a mystery

In which nothing is known.

The Hologram Tree

I look up into the branches,

The bright lights are shining.

It’s towering above my head-

So much effort for human kind.

 

As the mysterious shapes are uncovered,

Our secrets are shown,

Untold stories are passed

And agreements unrolled.

 

People are walking by,

Talking, eating, laughing and looking.

United in one stare,

In one flicker of an eye.

 

The projections are a comfort,

All the worries forgotten.

Replaced with the love:

The love of hate

Or the love for us

 

Each opinion defines us,

Our definition makes fate,

The fate will show our destiny,

Just like the stories

Which will remain untold.

The Grave of Ignor Prewett

This is the grave of Ignor Prewett.

This is a flower 
On the grave of Ignor Prewett.

This is a petal 
Of the elegant flower 
On the grave of Ignor Prewett.

This is a hand 
Which catches the yellow petal 
Of the wind-­‐‑blown flower 
On the grave of Ignor Prewett.

This is a toddler, smiling and looking 
At the tender hand 
Which grasps the delicate petal 
Of the squashed flower 
On the grave of Ignor Prewett.

This is a man 
Remembering the toddler, grinning and peering 
At the warm hand 
Which clutches the silky petal 
Of the rotting flower 
On the grave of Ignor Prewett.

This is a lady 
Who loved the affectionate man 
Who remembered the toddler, beaming and gazing 
At the fat hand 
Which clenches the withering petal 
Of the dead flower 
On the grave of Ignor Prewett.

This is the old man 
Who adored the lady 
Who married the altruistic man 
Who remembered the toddler, smiling and looking 
At the tiny hand 
Which grips the velvety petal 
Of the expired flower 
On the grave of Ignor Prewett.

This is a gravestone 
Of the old man 
Who fell for the forlorn lady 
Who married the benevolent man 
Who remembered the child looking 
At the hand 
Which held the yellowed petal 
Of the lifeless flower 
On the grave of Ignor Prewett. 

Thank you to all of those who submitted an entry into the Betjeman Poetry Prize 2016. A big congratulations goes out to all of our finalists: Annie Davison, Beth De La Rey, Jacob Heaton, Sofia Denno and Elspeth Hammick.

Archita has taken over from our 2015 Poet Laureate, Lucy Arnold-Forster. To read more about the Betjeman Poetry Prize competition in 2015, including all of Lucy Arnold-Forster's poems please read our Poetry at St Pancras in 2015 page.